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Instagram starts testing direct messaging on the web

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Instagram starts testing direct messaging on the web

Instagram starts testing direct messaging: Facebook-owned Instagram has announced that it has started testing direct messaging for its web platform. The direct messaging service is currently available for both iOS and Android applications.

“We’re currently testing Direct messaging on the web, so you can read and reply to your messages from wherever you are,” the company said in a statement. This means that the limited users will get to experience the new feature first and once the testing is concluded, the company will roll out the feature to the masses.

Facebook’s plans to allow Instagram Direct Meggasing over the web were first revealed last year by noted app leaker Jane Manchun Wong.

One can double click to like a message and can even share images from the desktop. Furthermore, one can create new groups as well. Users will receive desktop DM notification as well.

Users will be able to create chats from the profile screen via a newly added “message” button. And one may also able to share posts to others via DM as well as receive notifications on desktop if the browser supports it.

Previously, the brand new tool for creators making IGTV videos. Instagram has started rolling out an update announcing that the platform now supports series content on IGTV. With this update, creators on Instagram can organise their videos on a series page and batch videos under a single name to help differentiate it from other videos.

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TechCrunch reports, It also said social media platforms would extend end-to-end encryption from WhatsApp to include Instagram Direct and all of Facebook Messenger, though it could take years to complete. That security protocol means that only the sender and recipient would be able to view the contents of a message.

Via: tech.economictimes.indiatimes


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